Baptism I: Me or Us?

Table of Content

As I mentioned in the old "boy in the bands" blog, there's been a little stir on UUMA-CHAT, but since that's a confidential list for Unitarian Universalist ministers, I can't go into detail. But I can share what I posted, with the understanding that any sense of urgency will be misplaced since you are reading this out of context. With that caveat, and with identifying information removed:

One of the reasons I put Blondie on my "Music to Meditate the Trinity By" list (on the [defunct] blog) was their hit, "Atomic."

One of my biggest beefs (beeves?) with Unitarianism, both as a intradivine system and as an ecclesiological system is that is it consumed with atomistic thinking. Unitarianism, despite its covenantal basis (or perhaps, pretensions) is about "me," and perhaps "you," but rarely if ever about "us." Perhaps, too, that's why Unitarian historiography has for so long been captive to "great man" theory, or vice verse.

To prove the point: when was the last time you heard Principle 6, "The goal of world community" etc. lifted up?

Universalism is so much about the "us" (qua humanity, church, whatever) that it doesn't even matter if you're a Christian for salvation. Universalists are team-players. Christians have remembered Jesus' high-priestly prayer, "that [we] might be one." One of the realizations I had that led me down my present theological path is that my beliefs are neither unique nor the center of the universe, epitomized in the phrase "Get over yourself Wells!" God isn't beholden to me.

When someone is baptized, it isn't as Presbyterian, Catholic, or Universalist, but as a Christian. (I do wonder and worry if there's an unsaid fear that we UUs are just playing at religion, and that other people have the real thing, so it is better to stay away.) This is why persons from the various divisions of Christianity have often based their ecumenical work on a common baptism. That's why it is worth leaning into ecumenical norms in baptism -- and then bring the Unitarian or Universalist distinctives to the table.

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